Chocolate Brown Diamond

Chocolate Brown Diamond

What do you usually find in a creek bed-some minnows, tadpoles, or crawfish? What would you expect to find in a desert stream? What if among the stones and eddies you happened upon a raw diamond?

Diamonds were suspected to be present in the deserts of Western Australia since the late 19th century. But it wasn’t until 1976 that some geologists stumbled upon precious stones lying in Smoke Creek, near Lake Argyle. After a little more digging, this remote region of Australia was discovered to possess one of the largest deposits of diamonds in the world.

Natural diamonds need three main ingredients in order to exist: heat, pressure, and carbon. With temperatures has high as 2300 degrees Fahrenheit, under extreme pressure, carbon atoms grow into diamonds, the hardest substance known on earth. A pure carbon diamond is colorless. When a diamond has traces of other elements, such as nitrogen or boron, it exhibits a shade of color. Structural deformities that occurred during the formation of the diamond can also be a source of color. Geologists have discovered the elements and conditions that make a diamond blue, purple, or yellow. However, the source of the color of brown or chocolate diamonds, as well as the very rare pink diamonds, remains a mystery.

Argyle Diamond Mine now produces more than a third of the world’s total annual supply of diamonds. Eighty percent of the diamonds that come from this mine are of the brown variety. This is the birthplace of most of the world’s chocolate diamonds, which are responsible for billions of dollars in diamond sales. In recent years, less expensive cultured diamonds, those made in a laboratory, are becoming more popular because of their similarity to natural diamonds. Chocolate diamonds were once not considered as valuable as white diamonds. Over time, though, the world has come to enthusiastically embrace their unique beauty and elegance.

Chocolate diamonds demonstrate several things. They are, like all diamonds, examples of the worst of conditions producing priceless results. We too are made of carbon, honed and formed by the heat and pressure of our experiences. Chocolate diamonds also demonstrate the reward that follows endurance and patience; that which is valuable can be found if we just keep looking. Given time, our value will likewise eventually be recognized. But chocolate diamonds are also the result of a physical flaw. They are indeed not perfect. Yet it is their imperfection that is the very source of their amazing beauty.

Kenner Beckley is driven by the mission statement to “create aha!” and is always looking for spiritual connections in the commonplace. He has a site devoted to the stunning beauty and affordability of fancy chocolate diamonds at: http://chocolatediamondsforever.com/

Chocolate Brown Diamond
Chocolate Brown Diamond
Chocolate Brown Diamond

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